Governor Sakaja Defends Cutting Down Of Iconic Tree Along Kenyatta Avenue

Nairobi Governor Johnson Sakaja has defended the County from public attacks after staff cut down branches of the iconic Acacia tree along Kenyatta Avenue.

Capital News

HomePresidential PetitionsKenyaWorldCountiesCorona VirusOP-EDMore

CONNECT WITH US   

Hi, What Are You Looking For?

 

SEARCH

top

Capital News

Capital News

 

 

 

Governor Sakaja defends the cutting of an iconic tree along Kenyatta Avenue. /COURTESY

KENYAGovernor Sakaja Defends Cutting Down Of Iconic Tree Along Kenyatta Avenue

 

ByCORRESPONDENT

Published9 hours ago

0

SHARES

Share

Tweet

NAIROBI, Kenya, Sept 23 – Nairobi Governor Johnson Sakaja has defended the County from public attacks after staff cut down branches of the iconic Acacia tree along Kenyatta Avenue.

 

Sakaja explained that the pruning has been done after an outcry by pedestrians due to the recent Marabou Stork invasion.

 

The Governor had initially ordered an internal probe into the incident.

 

 

He further stated that officials from his Environmental Department have assured him that the tree shall be nurtured.

 

The Governor reiterated that the County Government will increase the tree cover in the city.

 

City residents using the modified walkway along Kenyatta Avenue, leading to the Wabera Street intersection, have had to be cautious of a flock of marabou stork birds nesting in the area.

 

Pedestrians have occasionally had to contend with the indignity of having to carry birds’ droppings on the back of their suits, trousers, skirts, and if you are unlucky, on your face.

 

It is not uncommon to see pedestrians carefully avoiding the base of the tree when walking on the beautiful pavement.

 

The road projects in the city have chased away flocks of marabou storks, with the hardest hit being those that used to perch and nest on trees along Mombasa Road, especially around Nyayo Stadium.

 

ADVERTISEMENT. SCROLL TO CONTINUE READING.

 

When construction of the Nairobi Expressway started, many trees that had grown by the side of the road for years were uprooted to create room for the expanded thoroughfare.

 

With their habitat destroyed, the marabou storks migrated to the Kenyatta International Convention Centre, which is situated in the heart of the central business district.

 

But even here their stay was short-lived after the center’s management pruned all the acacia trees on the property.

 

In this article:featured, Kenya Comments

Popular

Ruto Orders Devolution Ministry To Transfer Pending County Functions

Raila: I Never Mentioned Sahrawi, Kenya-Morocco Relations Are Key

Havi Says Teachers’ Union Leaders Dishonest On CBC, Calls Out Doublespeak

Wetangula Says Ready To Provide Direction On House Majority Tussle

Ruto Jets Off To London For Queen Elizabeth II’s Funeral, Headed To The UN Thereafter

Azimio Fights To Present A United Front In Race For Governors’ Council Captaincy

Transforming Kenya Through A Competitive Manufacturing Base

Governor Barasa To Chair CoG Finance Committee, Njuki Assigned Health

JSC Interviews For 20 High Court Judges To Begin On Monday

Gachagua Takes Over President Ruto’s Former Office At Harambee Annex

ADVERTISEMENT

 

More On Capital News

 

Ebola Deaths In Uganda Climb To Four

 

Gachagua Says Govt To Review CBC With Aim Of Improving It

 

National Assembly Adds 10 More Committee To Expedite Legislative Work

 

Top Cooking Oil Brands Still In Retail Market Despite KEBS Recall

 

Miguna Announces Changes In Home-Coming Date To Mashujaa Day

 

Kamau Karori, Charles Kanjama, Eric Mutua Conferred Senior Counsel Titles

 

ODM Says United Despite Disagreements

 

24 Kenyans Rescued From Traffickers In Laos Amid Concerns Over Illegal Organ Extraction

Capital News

Partners Privacy Policy Advertise with us Contact Us

Copyright © 2022 Capital Digital Media

 

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Cookie settingsACCEPT


Caleb Mongare

176 Blog posts

Comments