A dangerous African snake named for its black mouth and The barba amarilla (“yellow chin”) of Latin America

Few animals strike as much fear into people as venomous snakes. Although the chances of running into a venomous snake, much less being bitten and dying from the toxin injected into one’s body, are miniscule compared to dying from cancer, heart disease, or an automobile accident, this see

 


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Few animals strike as much fear into people as venomous snakes. Although the chances of running into a venomous snake, much less being bitten and dying from the toxin injected into one’s body, are miniscule compared to dying from cancer, heart disease, or an automobile accident, this seemingly unreasonable fear remains very real for many people. The snakes described here live primarily in tropical regions, but some might be living in research centers and zoos near you.


  • A dangerous African snake named for its black mouth

    The “black,” or black-mouthed, mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) inhabits rocky savanna and can often be encountered on the ground, where it seems to be fond of termite mounds. Ranging in color from gray to dark brown, its name derives from the blackened inside of its mouth. The black mamba is feared because it is large and quick, and it possesses an extremely potent venom that kills most of its human victims. Despite its aggressive reputation, unprovoked attacks on humans have not been proved, and it is responsible for only a small number of deaths annually.

  • The barba amarilla (“yellow chin”) of Latin America

    The venom of some species, including the Okinawa habu (T. flavoviridis), an aggressive snake that often enters human dwellings in the Ryukyu Islands, is mildly dangerous. On the other hand, the venom of the terciopelo (B. asper), the fer-de-lance of Central America is necrotizing, painful, and often deadly. Other dangerous fer-de-lances include the jararaca  (B. jararca) of Brazil and the wutu (Bothrops alternatus) of Argentina


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