Ralf Rangnick Who is this man being mentioned at taking charge of the Interim Job at Manchester United.

All you need to know about his playing style, his philosophy, his Achievements and his Invesion of Gegenpressing.

After an uneventful career as a player, Rangnick began his coaching career in 1983, at age 25. In 1997, he was hired by former club Ulm 1846, with whom he won the Regionalliga Süd in his debut season. Rangnick was then appointed by Bundesliga club VfB Stuttgart, winning the UEFA Intertoto Cup in 2000, but was fired following a string of poor results. In 2001, he joined Hannover 96, winning the 2.Bundesliga, but was dismissed in 2004.

After a brief period with Schalke 04, Rangnick signed with 1899 Hoffenheim in 2006, and achieved successive promotions to lead the club to the Bundesliga. He departed the club in 2011 and returned to Schalke 04, where he won the 2011 DFB-Pokal and reached the semi-finals of the UEFA Champions League. In 2012, Rangnick joined Red Bull as the director of football at Red Bull Salzburg and RB Leipzig; he also served as the head coach of the latter across two periods between 2015 and 2019.

Rangnick helped to shape Gegenpressing, whereby the team, after losing possession, immediately attempts to win back possession, rather than falling back to regroup.His sides have been noted for their pressing and high attacking output, as well as for popularizing zonal marking.

Gegenpressing in details.

Width and depth are both principles of offense and defence as follows. 

Width in attack: The attacker tries to divide the defence by spreading strike points across a broad front, rather than attempting to force advances through narrow channels. This may involve play from the wings, or rapidly shifting into open lanes/open space when approaching the goal. Mainly using wingers, often gaps are made between defenders using the width. These gaps can be used to feed the ball to strikers.

Width in defence: The defender counters, trying to contract and deny width. Attackers are "shepherded" or channeled into narrower or more crowded avenues of approach

Depth in attack: The attacker uses depth by moving men up from the rear, but may use a constant "target striker" or front man to always be present deep in the defence.

Depth in defence: The defender also uses depth by marking supporting players in the opposing team, and holding back a man as cover for more advanced players, sometimes in a "sweeper" or "libero" role. Therefore, the attacking player with the ball won't have anyone open for a pass. Alternatively, defenders may abandon depth temporarily to set an offside trap.

Balance in defence: The defence attempts balanced coverage of vulnerable space. Defenders do not simply cluster on the right side for example, just because the ball is there at that time.

ATTACKING

Pass and move: This is the most basic team tactic — as soon as the ball has come into possession of the player, they need to be quick to decide whether to pass it or not. If they don't pass it immediately, they need to move with it; if they do pass it, they again need to move along, following the general ball movement.

This can also be used to mean that once a player has passed the ball he does not remain stationary but moves into a position where he can receive the ball again and give more options to the player in possession.

Give and go (or combination passing): This is a basic tactic which is essentially the same as 'pass and move', and is an essential part of the 'target man' style of play (see below). The player in possession of the ball plays a pass to a teammate and then immediately seeks to move into space. If the player who passed the ball can 'lose' his defensive marker (either through pace, movement, superior fitness or a lack of awareness on the part of the defender) he could then be free to receive a return pass and advance towards and possibly threaten the goal. When the ball is played by the receiving player immediately back to the first player this is known as a 'One-Two'

DEFENSIVE 

The first defender has the main responsibility for what the opponent in possession does, seeking to obstruct dangerous passes. The initial few seconds after a team has lost the ball are important, as the newly-defending team in these seconds will be poorly organised defensively. Wise first defending will contribute to the defending team managing to organise before the opponents attack.

The first defender should usually be the player closest to the opponent holding possession, but needs to be at the defending side of him in order to do an effective job. He or she should keep a distance of about two metres, although the ideal distance will vary with each situation. The point is to pressure the opponent as much as possible without giving him a large possibility of a dribble. As a dribble isn't as dangerous when the defending team is well organised, the distance may be shorter in these cases. Analogously, the distance should be increased if the defence is poorly organised.

In certain cases, the first defender should attempt a tackle. Often, however, this will increase the probability of being dribbled and passed.

The direction in which to move towards the opponent with possession of the ball may be the shortest direction. However, it may be of value to curve the defensive run, in order to channel (also called "show") the opponent in a certain direction. If the defensive team is well organised, he should be channelled ("shown") towards the centre of the pitch. In the case of temporarily poor defensive organisation, however, he should be channelled towards the line.

The second defender is for security if the first defender is passed. In that case, he takes over as first defender, and ideally one of the third defenders takes over as second defender. The team should be organised in a manner to make this transition as fast as possible. The typical ideal distance between the second and first defender is about six metres, but this will vary strongly from situation to situation. The most important factor is the opponent's speed. If he is moving fast, the distance should be longer. If he is standing still, the second and first defender may in some cases join forces and work as two first defenders.

The job of the third defender is to provide deep cover. He is generally in a stand-off position relative to the first and second defenders and tries to view the "big picture", keeping watch for new opponents moving up, and covering vulnerable gaps if the first and second defenders are bypassed. The sweeper role is sometimes conceived as that of a third defender, but every defensive player not immediately engaging the ball has the obligation to adjust his positioning to guard against dangerous situations and to plug vulnerable gaps. While the role of first and second defenders are rather similar, the third defenders' role is very different in zone defence and man-to-man defence. Also, their organisation will vary with formation.

HONOURS

 

Hannover 96

2.Bundesliga: 2001–02

 

Schalke 04

Bundesliga runner-up: 2004–05

DFB-Pokal: 2010–11; runner-up: 2004–05

DFL-Supercup: 2011

DFL-Ligapokal: 2005

 

RB Leipzig

DFB-Pokal runn er-up: 2019

His Ready to take charge of the Manchester United team at Interim basis but his asking for a bigger Role at the club after his time as the interim coach.

A big decision lies ahead for the Manchester United board of Directors. 


General Muhatsi

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